Kevin HernKevin Hern

Current Position: US Representative for OK 1st District since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Businessman from 1999 – 2018

Featured Quote: 
Pelosi told Capitol police to arrest any of my staff that refused to wear a mask… yet Biden & Pelosi are letting almost 200k illegal immigrants per month pour across our southern border w/o regard to the spread of COVID across our country. Still they say they care about America?

Featured Video: 
Hern praises welfare reform, work requirements as the only path to self-sufficiency

In second term, Hern positioned to wield influence on key issues
Tulsa World, Randy KrehbielSeptember 5, 2021 (Medium)

Midway through his second term, 1st District Congressman Kevin Hern has positioned himself about where he wants. He has a seat on the House Ways and Means Committee and what seems to be growing influence on GOP tax and health care policy.

Besides the plum committee assignment, Hern is chairman of the Budget and Spending Task Force of the Republican Study Committee, the policy arm of the House Republican conference, and is on a House GOP health care task force.

These developments are very much in line with Hern’s ambitions when he became a congressional candidate in 2018. Then the owner of several businesses, including a string of McDonald’s restaurants, he went to Washington with definite ideas about about he wanted to do.

Federal spending and health care system reform were near the top of his list.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for OK 1st District since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Businessman from 1999 – 2018

Featured Quote: 
Pelosi told Capitol police to arrest any of my staff that refused to wear a mask… yet Biden & Pelosi are letting almost 200k illegal immigrants per month pour across our southern border w/o regard to the spread of COVID across our country. Still they say they care about America?

Featured Video: 
Hern praises welfare reform, work requirements as the only path to self-sufficiency

News

In second term, Hern positioned to wield influence on key issues
Tulsa World, Randy KrehbielSeptember 5, 2021 (Medium)

Midway through his second term, 1st District Congressman Kevin Hern has positioned himself about where he wants. He has a seat on the House Ways and Means Committee and what seems to be growing influence on GOP tax and health care policy.

Besides the plum committee assignment, Hern is chairman of the Budget and Spending Task Force of the Republican Study Committee, the policy arm of the House Republican conference, and is on a House GOP health care task force.

These developments are very much in line with Hern’s ambitions when he became a congressional candidate in 2018. Then the owner of several businesses, including a string of McDonald’s restaurants, he went to Washington with definite ideas about about he wanted to do.

Federal spending and health care system reform were near the top of his list.

Twitter

About

Kevin Hern 1

Source: Government page

Born on an Air Force Base, Kevin Hern gained an early appreciation for the sacrifices that military families make. In high school, Kevin earned an Architectural Drafting Certificate at a Career Technology school, which he used to work and pay for his Engineering degree. Later in life, he earned his MBA.

He went on to work as an Aerospace Engineer for Rockwell. Then began saving to purchase his first McDonald’s Restaurant by starting and operating small business ventures: writing computer programs to automate tasks for businesses, real estate, and even hog farming.

In 1997, Kevin literally sold the hog farm to buy his first McDonald’s restaurant in North Little Rock, Arkansas. In 1999, he purchased two McDonald’s restaurants in Muskogee, Oklahoma. He grew that organization over the next decade; eventually owning 24 McDonald’s restaurants that employed hundreds of people in the Tulsa, Oklahoma area.

Kevin has worked across every aisle by serving in various leadership positions within the McDonald’s system – what he dubs the most grassroots business in the world. He served 13 years on the National Leadership Team that represented all of the 3,500+ U.S. Franchisees, serving for 8 years as the Ombudsman and 5 years as the chairman of the Systems Economic Team.

In addition to McDonald’s, Kevin has been a very successful entrepreneur in the areas of banking, manufacturing, real estate development, multiple technology companies, and sports publishing.

He uses this business acumen to help aspiring entrepreneurs create new businesses, so they can pursue their American Dream.

Kevin Hern was sworn into Congress on November 13th, 2018 serving the remainder of Congressman Jim Bridenstine’s term. Kevin and his wife Tammy live in Tulsa and have three children. They are members at the Church at Battle Creek.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Republican Study Committee, Budget and Spending Task Force Chairman
Small Business Caucus, Co-Chair 
Pro-Life Caucus
Southern Caucus
Taiwan Caucus
Border Security Caucus
Municipal Finance Caucus
Values Action Team
Republican Israel Caucus
Congressional Tourette Syndrome Caucus
Diabetes Caucus
Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus
Western Caucus
Native American Caucus
Air Force Caucus
House Energy Action Team
Freshman Working Group on Addiction
Spina Bifida Caucus
Congressional Caucus on Armenian Issues
Congressional Chicken Caucus
Congressional Fires Services Caucus
Congressional Rare Disease Caucus
Congressional Azerbaijan Caucus
ALS Caucus
Library of Congress Caucus

Offices

Washington, DC Office

1019 Longworth House Office Building
WashingtonDC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-2211

Get Directions to the DC Office

District Offices

Tulsa Office

2448 East 81st Street
Suite 5150
TulsaOK 74137

Phone: (918) 935-3222

Get Directions to the Tulsa Office

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Kevin Ray Hern (born December 4, 1961) is an American businessman and politician from the state of Oklahoma. A Republican, he is a member of the United States House of Representatives for Oklahoma’s 1st congressional district. He was elected in 2018.

Early life and education

Hern graduated from Dover High School in Dover, Arkansas, in 1980, and Arkansas Tech University in 1986.[1] He worked at Rockwell International and attended the Georgia Institute of Technology, studying for a Ph.D. in astronautical engineering.[2]

Career

After the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, Hern had difficulty finding a job, and became a McDonald’s franchisee. He bought his first McDonald’s in North Little Rock, Arkansas in 1997. He sold the North Little Rock franchise in 1999 to move to Muskogee, Oklahoma, where he bought two franchises. He expanded his business to 18 franchises in the Tulsa, Oklahoma area.[2]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2018

After Jim Bridenstine resigned from the United States House of Representatives in 2018 to become administrator of NASA, Hern ran to succeed him in Oklahoma’s 1st congressional district in the 2018 elections. Hern advanced to the runoff,[3][4] where he defeated Tim Harris.[5] He then advanced to the general election, where he defeated Democratic nominee Tim Gilpin.[6] Outgoing Governor Mary Fallin then appointed Hern to serve the balance of Bridenstine’s third term. She was able to do so because under Oklahoma law, if a House seat falls vacant in an even-numbered year and the incumbent’s term is due to end the following year, the governor can appoint someone to serve the remainder of the term. Accordingly, Hern was sworn into the House on November 13.[7][8]

2020

Hern defeated Democratic nominee Kojo Asamoa-Caesar and Independent Evelyn L. Rogers in the November 2020 general election.

Tenure

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Hern’s KTAK Corporation received between $1 million and $2 million in federally backed small business loans from American Bank and Trust as part of the Paycheck Protection Program. KTAK stated it would retain 220 jobs. The loan was seen as notable since Hern is a vocal opponent of deficit spending; in 2018, discussing a balanced budget, he said, “While there is no easy fix to this, the first step is clear: stop adding to it.” In 2020, he said, “This isn’t a bailout. It’s a repayment of what the government has taken away from American workers and businesses.”[9][10][11] KTAK operates franchises. During the Paycheck Protection Program negotiations, Hern pushed to increase the amount of aid going to franchises.[11]

In December 2020, Hern was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden prevailed[12] over incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[13][14][15]

In July 2021, Hern voted against the bipartisan ALLIES Act, which would increase by 8,000 the number of special immigrant visas for Afghan allies of the U.S. military during its invasion of Afghanistan, while also reducing some application requirements that caused long application backlogs; the bill passed in the House 407–16.[16]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Republican primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Tim Harris 28,392 27.5
Republican Kevin Hern 23,425 22.7
RepublicanAndy Coleman22,58421.9
RepublicanNathan Dahm20,84320.2
RepublicanDanny Stockstill8,0867.8
Total votes103,330 100.0
Republican primary runoff results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Kevin Hern 40,373 54.9
RepublicanTim Harris33,13845.1
Total votes73,511 100.0
Oklahoma’s 1st congressional district, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Kevin Hern 150,129 59.3
DemocraticTim Gilpin103,04240.7
Total votes253,171 100.0
Republican hold
Oklahoma’s 1st congressional district, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Kevin Hern 213,700 63.70
DemocraticKojo Asamoa-Caesar109,64132.68
IndependentEvelyn L. Rogers12,1303.62
Total votes335,471 100.0
Republican hold

Personal life

Hern and his wife, Tammy, have three children and two grandchildren.[18]

References

  1. ^ “Dover native receives Congressional GOP nomination in Oklahoma”. Couriernews.com. Archived from the original on October 20, 2018. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  2. ^ a b Hardiman, Samuel (August 5, 2016). “5 Questions with Kevin Hern, McDonald’s franchisee | 5 Questions”. Tulsa World. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  3. ^ World, Randy Krehbiel Tulsa. “Tim Harris, Kevin Hern headed to 1st Congressional District runoff; Democrats also going to second round”. Retrieved November 8, 2018.
  4. ^ “Rare runoffs to decide 1st Congressional District nominees | Homepagelatest”. tulsaworld.com. August 26, 2018. Retrieved November 8, 2018.
  5. ^ “Kevin Hern beats Tim Harris for Congressional 1st District Republican nomination”. tulsaworld.com. August 28, 2018. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  6. ^ “Kevin Hern beats Tim Gilpin to replace Jim Bridenstine in Congress”. Tulsa World. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  7. ^ Catherine Sweeney (November 8, 2018). “Hern taking office ahead of freshman congressional class”. The Journal Record.
  8. ^ “New 1st District Congressman Kevin Hern sworn in | Government”. tulsaworld.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved November 14, 2018.
  9. ^ Tom Hamburger; Aaron Gregg; Anu Narayanswamy (July 8, 2020). “After railing against federal spending, GOP lawmakers, conservative groups benefit from government aid program”. Washington Post. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  10. ^ Syed, Moiz; Willis, Derek. “KTAK CORPORATION I – Coronavirus Bailouts – ProPublica”. ProPublica. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  11. ^ a b “Treasury, SBA data show small-business loans went to private-equity backed chains, members of Congress”. The Washington Post. 2020.
  12. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  13. ^ Liptak, Adam (December 11, 2020). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  14. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. December 11, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  15. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  16. ^ Quarshie, Mabinty (August 17, 2021). “These 16 Republicans voted against speeding up visas for Afghans fleeing the Taliban”. USA Today. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  17. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  18. ^ “Quick 5: Congressional District 1 candidates answer questions”. Muskogee Phoenix. Retrieved January 27, 2019.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Jim Bridenstine
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Oklahoma’s 1st congressional district

2018–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Troy Balderson
United States representatives by seniority
293rd
Succeeded by
Joseph Morelle


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Ways and Means (117th Congress)
    • Subcommittee on Social Security
    • Subcommittee on Select Revenue Measures
    • Subcommittee on Worker and Family Support
  • Committee on Small Business (116th Congress)
    • Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Tax and Capital Access (Ranking Member)
    • Subcommittee on Health and Technology
  • Committee on Natural Resources (116th Congress)
    • Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources (Deputy Republican Leader)
    • Subcommittee on Indigenous Peoples of the United States
  • Committee on the Budget (116th Congress)

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

X
Markwayne MullinMarkwayne Mullin

Current Position: US Representative for OK 2nd District since 2013
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Businessman from 1997 – 2013

Featured Quote: 
Socialist policies don’t work, but that’s exactly what President Biden and Speaker Pelosi are forcing on the American people. And now our country is in crisis because of it. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to be here in Washington fighting back. #WeeklyWrapUp

Featured Video: 
Rep. Mullin Questions FBI Director Wray about Threat of Antifa in Intelligence Committee Hearing

The first commercial flight to take off from Afghanistan lands safely in Qatar – 100 foreigners, including Americans, were on board.

It’s news Congressman Markwayne Mullin says is encouraging, but he’s still skeptical of the operation.

NewsChannel 8’s Erin Christy has his reaction to the flight, and his controversial, personal effort to rescue Americans.

Congressman Mullin took a lot of heat over his trip to rescue Americans from Afghanistan.

He says he did it because the organization he teamed up with said they couldn’t do it without him.

“At that point, it’s how do you say no — you’ve asked somebody to help you know it’s a situation that needs to be taken care of and how do you walk away from it,” Mullin said.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for OK 2nd District since 2013
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Businessman from 1997 – 2013

Featured Quote: 
Socialist policies don’t work, but that’s exactly what President Biden and Speaker Pelosi are forcing on the American people. And now our country is in crisis because of it. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to be here in Washington fighting back. #WeeklyWrapUp

Featured Video: 
Rep. Mullin Questions FBI Director Wray about Threat of Antifa in Intelligence Committee Hearing

News

The first commercial flight to take off from Afghanistan lands safely in Qatar – 100 foreigners, including Americans, were on board.

It’s news Congressman Markwayne Mullin says is encouraging, but he’s still skeptical of the operation.

NewsChannel 8’s Erin Christy has his reaction to the flight, and his controversial, personal effort to rescue Americans.

Congressman Mullin took a lot of heat over his trip to rescue Americans from Afghanistan.

He says he did it because the organization he teamed up with said they couldn’t do it without him.

“At that point, it’s how do you say no — you’ve asked somebody to help you know it’s a situation that needs to be taken care of and how do you walk away from it,” Mullin said.

Twitter

About

Source: Government page

Congressman Markwayne Mullin was first elected to serve the people of Oklahoma’s Second Congressional District in November 2012. He is currently serving his fifth term in office.

Mullin and his wife Christie have been married since 1997 and have six children: Jim, Jayce, Andrew, Larra, Ivy, and Lynette. The Mullin family currently resides on their ranch in Westville, Oklahoma, which includes the original allotment land his family received as Cherokees. They are members of the Assembly of God Church.

A graduate of Stilwell High School, Mullin attended Missouri Valley College on a wrestling scholarship. Shortly after, Mullin’s father fell ill and the family’s plumbing company encountered financial troubles. Mullin left college to return home and take over his family’s business, forgoing his wrestling scholarship and education.

Markwayne and Christie founded multiple successful companies including Mullin Plumbing, Mullin Environmental, Mullin Services, Mullin Properties, and Rowan’s Steakhouse to name a few. Today, Mullin Plumbing is one of the largest service companies in the region. Together, Markwayne and Christie employ hundreds of employees across the state. As one of the few business owners in Congress, Mullin brings the business perspective into the national debate on many issues directly impacting Oklahoma’s thousands of small businesses.

Mullin is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation. As one of only five Native Americans currently serving in the House, Mullin brings a firsthand knowledge of Native American issues to Washington, D.C.

Mullin is a former Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighter with a professional record of 5-0 and he was inducted into the Oklahoma Wrestling Hall of Fame in 2016. He remains active in the wrestling community and on any given weekend he can be found coaching his kids and other young people in tournaments across the country. Mullin also leads a bipartisan workout group every morning he is in Washington, bringing both Republicans and Democrats together in their dislike of burpees.

In 2010, Mullin completed his education and received his degree in Applied Science in Construction Technology from Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology. Additionally, he received an honorary doctorate degree from Bacone College in 2018.

Mullin currently serves on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, including the Subcommittee on Communications and Technology, Subcommittee on Health, and on Environment and Climate Change. Mullin also serves on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, including the Subcommittee on Defense Intelligence and Warfighter Support and the Subcommittee on Strategic Technologies and Advanced Research.. Additionally, Mullin is a member of a number of  caucuses, and is a co-chair of the House Energy Action Team (HEAT) and the Innovation Caucus.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

ghhgggg

Offices

Washington, D.C. Office

2421 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Phone: (202) 225-2701
Fax: (202) 225-3038
Hours: Monday-Friday, 9:00am-6:00pm ET

McAlester District Office

1 E. Choctaw, Suite 175
McAlester, OK 74501

Phone: (918) 423-5951
Fax: (918) 423-1940
Hours: Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm CT

Muskogee District Office

811-A N. York St.

Muskogee, OK 74403


Phone: (918) 687-2533
Fax: (918) 686-0128
Hours: By appointment only.

Claremore District Office

223 W. Patti Page Blvd.
Claremore, OK 74017

Phone: (918) 283-6262
Fax: (918) 923-6451
Hours: Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm CT

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Mark Wayne “Markwayne” Mullin (born July 26, 1977) is an American politician, businessman and former professional mixed martial arts fighter serving as the U.S. Representative for Oklahoma’s 2nd congressional district since 2013. He is a member of the Republican Party. Mullin’s district covers about a quarter of the state in its eastern part.

Early life and education

Mullin was born on July 26, 1977, in Tulsa, Oklahoma.[2] He graduated from Stilwell High School in Stilwell, Oklahoma.[3] He attended Missouri Valley College in 1996, but did not graduate.[2] In 2010, Mullin received an associate degree in construction technology from Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology.[2][4]

Business career

Mullin took over his family’s business, Mullin Plumbing, at age 20, when his father fell ill. He also owns Mullin Properties, Mullin Farms, and Mullin Services.[5] He hosted House Talk, a home improvement radio program syndicated across Oklahoma, on Tulsa station KFAQ.[2][6]

U.S. House of Representatives

Congressman Markwayne Mullin (R-OK), along with two of the other (at the time four) Native American Members of Congress, Deb Haaland (D-NM) and Sharice Davids (D-KS), testified in front of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Select Revenue Measurers, March 4, 2020

Elections

2012

In June 2011, incumbent Democratic U.S. Congressman Dan Boren announced that he would retire at the end of 2012.[7] In September 2011, Mullin declared his candidacy for the 2012 elections to the United States House of Representatives to represent Oklahoma’s 2nd congressional district.[8] Mullin branded himself as an outsider; his campaign slogan was “A rancher. A businessman. Not a politician!”[9]

In the six-candidate Republican primary, Mullin finished first with 42% of the vote; state representative George Faught ranked second with 22% of the vote.[10] In the runoff primary election, Mullin defeated Faught 57%–43%.[11][12]

The 2nd District has historically been a classic “Yellow Dog” Democratic district, but has steadily trended Republican as Tulsa‘s suburbs have spilled into its northern portion. For this reason, Mullin was thought to have a good chance of winning the election. He defeated the Democratic nominee, former district attorney Rob Wallace, 57%–38%,[13] becoming the first Republican to represent the district since Tom Coburn in 2001,[14] and only the second since 1921.

2016

In the June 2016 Republican primary, Mullin defeated Jarrin Jackson by 27 percentage points. In the November general election, he defeated Democrat Joshua Harris-Till by 47 percentage points.[15]

2018

When he first ran for Congress in 2012, Mullin promised to serve only three terms (six years). But in July 2017, he released a video announcing that he would run for a fourth term in 2018, saying he was ill-advised when he made the promise to only serve three terms.[16]

Tenure

On February 5, 2014, Mullin introduced the bill To revoke the charter of incorporation of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma at the request of that tribe (H.R. 4002; 113th Congress), which would accept the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma‘s request to revoke the charter of incorporation issued to it and ratified by its members on June 1, 1940.[17]

In April 2017, Mullin drew criticism when he was recorded during a town hall meeting telling his constituents that it was “bullcrap” that taxpayers pay his salary. He said, “I pay for myself. I paid enough taxes before I got here and continue to through my company to pay my own salary. This is a service. No one here pays me to go.”[18]

In December 2020, Mullin was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated[19] incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[20][21][22]

During the 2021 storming of the United States Capitol, Mullin, along with Texas representatives Troy Nehls (a former Sheriff and Army veteran) and Pat Fallon (an Air Force veteran) helped U.S. Capitol Police build barricades and protect the doors to the House chamber from the rioters. He and many of his colleagues were later ushered to a secure location, where he declined offers to wear a mask, in violation of House rules.[23][24] Mullin said that he witnessed the shooting of Trump supporter Ashli Babbitt during the attack, which occurred after she climbed through a barricade leading towards the House Chamber; Mullin’s opinion was that the Capitol police officer “didn’t have a choice” but to shoot, and that this action “saved people’s lives”, with members of Congress and their staff “in danger” from the “mob”.[25][26][27]

August 2021 Afghanistan visit

On August 30, 2021, during the final days of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, Mullin asked officials of the U.S. embassy in Tajikistan for assistance in going to Afghanistan to retrieve five American citizens. Because the plan involved violations of Tajikistan currency restrictions, the embassy staffers refused. The U.S. State Department had warned Mullin not to try his own rescue of Americans in Afghanistan, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy had both urged members of Congress to avoid travel to Afghanistan during the final days of the U.S. military presence.[28]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Mixed martial arts record

Professional record breakdown
3 matches3 wins0 losses
By knockout10
By submission20
By decision00
By disqualification00
Unknown00

[31]

Res.RecordOpponentMethodEventDateRoundTimeLocationNotes
Win3–0Clinton BondsTKO (punches)XFLApril 7, 200721:27Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States
Win2–0Clinton BondsSubmission (armbar)XFL SuperbrawlFebruary 3, 20072n/aTulsa, Oklahoma, United States
Win1–0Bobby KelleySubmission (rear-naked choke)XFLNovember 11, 200610:46Miami, Oklahoma, United States

Personal life

Mullin and his wife, Christie, live in Westville, a few miles from the Arkansas border, and have five children.[2] He is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation.[32] Mullin is one of six Native Americans in the 117th Congress. The others are Tom Cole, a Chickasaw[33] of Oklahoma; Yvette Herrell,[34] a Cherokee of New Mexico; and Sharice Davids of Kansas, a Ho-Chunk. Deb Haaland of New Mexico, a Laguna Pueblo, was the fifth.[35] Haaland resigned in March 2021 to become Secretary of the Interior, returning the number of Native Americans in Congress to five.

See also

References

  1. ^ Oklahoma State Vital Records Index
  2. ^ a b c d e “Markwayne Mullin”. Roll Call. Retrieved November 8, 2012.
  3. ^ “Markwayne Mullin Tapped to Give National Republican Address | .Politics”. Blog.newsok.com. October 16, 2012. Archived from the original on December 16, 2012. Retrieved November 8, 2012.
  4. ^ MULLIN, Markwayne, (1977 – ) Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. 1774-Present. Retrieved April 13, 2017
  5. ^ “Markwayne Mullin wins District 2 Congressional seat”. KJRH 2. Scripps TV Station Group. November 7, 2012. Archived from the original on January 27, 2013. Retrieved November 8, 2012.
  6. ^ “Meet the Mullin Family”. Markwayne Mullin for Congress. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2013.
  7. ^ Casteel, Chris (June 7, 2011). “Oklahoma’s U.S. Rep. Dan Boren won’t seek re-election in 2012”. News OK. Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  8. ^ “Markwayne Mullin makes Congressional bid official”. www.krmg.com. Retrieved November 8, 2012.
  9. ^ Archive of Mullin’s campaign site from 2012
  10. ^ “OK District 2 – R Primary Race – Jun 26, 2012”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved August 30, 2013.
  11. ^ “OK District 2 – R Runoff Race – Aug 28, 2012”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved August 30, 2013.
  12. ^ State Election Results, Runoff, Oklahoma State Elections Board.
  13. ^ “OK – District 02 Race – Nov 06, 2012”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved August 30, 2013.
  14. ^ Krehbiel, Mark (November 7, 2012). “Republican Markwayne Mullin voted into 2nd District Seat”. Tulsa World. Retrieved November 8, 2012.
  15. ^ Wingerter, Justin (July 8, 2017). “Coburn will work to oust Mullin after congressman breaks term limit pledge”. Oklahoman.com. Retrieved September 3, 2019.
  16. ^ Krehbiel, Randy. “Markwayne Mullin to seek fourth term, explains why he’s breaking three-term campaign pledge”. Tulsa World. Tulsa World. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  17. ^ “H.R. 4002 – Summary”. United States Congress. Retrieved June 23, 2014.
  18. ^ Vladimirov, Nikita (April 13, 2017). “GOP rep: ‘Bullcrap’ to say taxpayers pay my salary”. The Hill. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  19. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  20. ^ Liptak, Adam (December 11, 2020). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  21. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. December 11, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  22. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  23. ^ Keri Enriquez. “Republican members of Congress refuse to wear masks during Capitol insurrection”. CNN. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  24. ^ Beavers, Olivia (January 21, 2021). “How lawmakers trapped in the House stood their ground”. POLITICO. Retrieved February 1, 2021.
  25. ^ Cathey, Libby; Thorbecke, Catherine; Winsor, Morgan; Sanchez, Rosa (January 7, 2021). “Congressman recalls moment woman was shot inside Capitol building”. ABC News. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved June 17, 2021.
  26. ^ Melendez, Pilar; Bredderman, William; Montgomery, Blake (January 8, 2021). Didn’t Have a Choice’: Vet Was Climbing Through Broken Window When She Was Shot Dead”. The Daily Beast. Retrieved June 17, 2021.
  27. ^ Beckett, Lois; Ho, Vivian (January 9, 2021). She was deep into it’: Ashli Babbitt, killed in Capitol riot, was devoted conspiracy theorist”. The Guardian. Archived from the original on January 9, 2021.
  28. ^ Tyler Pager; John Hudson (August 31, 2021). “Oklahoma congressman threatened embassy staff as he tried to enter Afghanistan, U.S. officials say”. The Washington Post. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  29. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  30. ^ “Members”. Congressional Western Caucus. Retrieved June 25, 2018.
  31. ^ Sherdog.com. “Markwayne Mullin MMA Stats, Pictures, News, Videos, Biography – Sherdog.com”. Sherdog. Retrieved June 22, 2020.
  32. ^ “This Cherokee congressman is for Trump – and Indian Country”, High Country News
  33. ^ Bogado, Aura (March 1, 2013). “Why Does Congress’s Only Cherokee Member Keep Voting Against VAWA?”. The Nation. Retrieved August 30, 2013.
  34. ^ New Mexico becomes first state to elect all women of color to the House of Representatives
  35. ^ Olmstead, Molly. “Sharice Davids, Deb Haaland Become First Native American Women Elected to Congress”. Slate Magazine. Retrieved November 7, 2018.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Dan Boren
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Oklahoma’s 2nd congressional district

2013–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Grace Meng
United States representatives by seniority
182nd
Succeeded by
Scott Perry


 

Issues

Committees

Committee on Energy and Commerce

  • Subcommittee on Health
  • Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change
  • Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

X
Frank LucasFrank Lucas

Current Position: US Representative for OK 3rd District since 1994
Affiliation: Republican

Featured Quote: 
Today, instead of working with Republicans, House Democrats passed an appropriations bill jam-packed with partisan policy provisions and irresponsible levels of government spending. Congress must return to regular order.

Featured Video: 
ONR Extra with Oklahoma Congressman Frank Lucas

Rep. Frank Lucas, (R) OK-3:

“President Biden’s exploitation of a vaccine mandate is an egregious act of federal overreach.

While my wife and I have taken the personal responsibility to be vaccinated- and I encourage all eligible Oklahomans to get vaccinated- the decision should be a personal decision done in consultation with one’s health care provider, not dictated by the government.

Despite efforts through private-sector incentives, Oklahoma businesses are now forced to grapple with an impermissible government mandate that hinders their ability to retain workers and recover from the economic effects of COVID.

The President’s mandate should be struck down.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for OK 3rd District since 1994
Affiliation: Republican

Featured Quote: 
Today, instead of working with Republicans, House Democrats passed an appropriations bill jam-packed with partisan policy provisions and irresponsible levels of government spending. Congress must return to regular order.

Featured Video: 
ONR Extra with Oklahoma Congressman Frank Lucas

News

Rep. Frank Lucas, (R) OK-3:

“President Biden’s exploitation of a vaccine mandate is an egregious act of federal overreach.

While my wife and I have taken the personal responsibility to be vaccinated- and I encourage all eligible Oklahomans to get vaccinated- the decision should be a personal decision done in consultation with one’s health care provider, not dictated by the government.

Despite efforts through private-sector incentives, Oklahoma businesses are now forced to grapple with an impermissible government mandate that hinders their ability to retain workers and recover from the economic effects of COVID.

The President’s mandate should be struck down.”

Twitter

About

Frank Lucas 1

Source: Government page

Congressman Frank Lucas is a fifth generation Oklahoman whose family has lived and farmed in Oklahoma for over 100 years. Born on January 6, 1960 in Cheyenne, Oklahoma, Lucas graduated from Oklahoma State University in 1982 with a degree in Agricultural Economics. He was first elected to the United States House of Representatives in a special election in 1994.

Lucas proudly represents Oklahoma’s Third Congressional District, which includes all or portions of 32 counties in northern and western Oklahoma, stretching from the Oklahoma panhandle to parts of Tulsa, and from Yukon to Altus in the southwest. It takes up almost half the state’s land mass and is one of the largest agricultural regions in the nation. Lucas has been a crusader for the American farmer since being elected to Congress in 1994 and he has fought to protect Oklahoma values.

Congressman Lucas serves on the House Committee on Financial Services and as Ranking Member on the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Congressional Western Caucus

Offices

Washington, D.C.

2405 Rayburn HOB
WashingtonDC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-5565
Fax: (202) 225-8698

Canadian County Office

10952 NW Expressway Suite B
YukonOK 73099

Phone: (405) 373-1958
Fax: (405) 373-2046

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Frank Dean Lucas (born January 6, 1960) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Oklahoma’s 3rd congressional district since 2003, having previously represented the 6th district from 1994 to 2003. He is a member of the Republican Party and serves as the ranking minority member of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology. His district, numbered as the 6th district from 1994 to 2003, is the largest congressional district in the state and one of the largest in the nation that does not cover an entire state. It covers 34,088.49 square miles and stretches from the Panhandle to the fringes of the Tulsa suburbs, covering almost half of the state’s land mass. Lucas is the dean of Oklahoma’s House delegation.

United States House of Representatives

Tenure

On April 7, 2014, Lucas introduced the Customer Protection and End User Relief Act (H.R. 4413; 113th Congress) into the House.[1] The bill would reauthorize the Commodity Futures Trading Commission through 2018 and amend some provisions of the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.[2][3]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political campaigns

Oklahoma Congressman Frank Lucas speaks at a town hall meeting held in the Pioneer Technology Center in Ponca City, Oklahoma on September 26, 2011.

Oklahoma House of Representatives

Lucas first ran for the Oklahoma House of Representatives in 1984 as a Republican against the incumbent Democrat, narrowly losing. A second attempt in 1986 also fell short, but he won in 1988. He lost in 1990 after the legislature made his district somewhat friendlier to Democrats, but he returned in 1992.

U. S. House of Representatives

In 1994, 6th district Congressman Glenn English stepped down to become a lobbyist for rural electric cooperatives. Lucas won the Republican nomination for the special election on May 10. He faced Dan Webber, press secretary to U.S. Senator David L. Boren. The 6th was already by far the largest in the state, stretching from the Panhandle to the town of Spencer, in the far northeastern Oklahoma City metropolitan area. But the state legislature had redrawn it so that it included many poor Oklahoma City neighborhoods that had never voted Republican. Lucas scored a major upset, winning by eight percentage points and carrying 18 of the district’s 24 counties. Some pundits have seen his victory as an early sign of the Republican Revolution that November, when Republicans took control of the House for the first time in 40 years. Lucas won a full term in November with 70% of the vote. He has been reelected seven times, never with less than 59% of the vote, and was unopposed in 2002 and 2004.

Lucas’s district was renumbered as the 3rd after Oklahoma lost a district in the 2000 Census. His already vast district was made even larger. He lost most of his share of Oklahoma City, which was home to 60% of the district’s population. He once represented much of the downtown area, including the site of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. He still represents the part of the city in Canadian County. To make up for this large population loss, the 3rd was pushed farther east, picking up several of Tulsa’s western suburbs (including a small portion of Tulsa itself) and some rural areas. As a result, his district now includes 48.5% of the state’s landmass, and is nearly as large as the state’s other four districts combined.

2014 Republican primary

In the 2014 Republican primary, Lucas won 83% of the vote. 12% went to Robert Hubbard and 5% to Timothy Ray Murray.[5]

Frank Lucas (116th Congress)

Electoral history

Oklahoma’s 6th congressional district: Results 1992–2000[6]
YearDemocraticVotesPctRepublicanVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct
1992Glenn English *134,73468%Bob Anthony64,06832%
1994Jeffrey S. Tollett45,39930%Frank D. Lucas106,96170%
1996Paul M. Barby64,17336%Frank D. Lucas113,49964%
1998Paul M. Barby43,55533%Frank D. Lucas85,26165%Ralph B. Finkle, Jr.Independent2,4552%
2000Randy Beutler63,10639%Frank D. Lucas95,63559%Joseph V. CristianoLibertarian2,4352%

* English resigned mid-term, and Lucas won the special election to succeed him against Democratic opponent Dan Webber.

Oklahoma’s 3rd congressional district: Results 2002–2010[6]
YearDemocraticVotesPctRepublicanVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct
2002(no candidate)Frank D. Lucas148,20676%Robert T. MurphyIndependent47,88424%
2004(no candidate)Frank D. Lucas215,51082%Gregory M. WilsonIndependent46,62118%
2006Sue Barton61,74933%Frank D. Lucas128,04267%
2008Frankie Robbins62,29724%Frank D. Lucas184,30670%Forrest MichaelIndependent17,7567%
2010Frankie Robbins45,68422%Frank D. Lucas161,91578%
2012Timothy Ray Murray53,47220%Frank D. Lucas201,74475%William M. SandersIndependent12,7875%
2014Frankie Robbins36,27021%Frank D. Lucas133,33579%
2016Frankie Robbins63,09022%Frank D. Lucas227,52578%
2018Frankie Robbins61,15226%Frank D. Lucas172,91374%
2020Zoe Midyett66,50122%Frank D. Lucas242,67778%

Personal life

Lucas is a fifth-generation Oklahoman; his family has farmed in western Oklahoma for over 100 years. He lives in Cheyenne with his wife, Lynda. They have three children and three grandchildren.[7]

References

  1. ^ “H.R. 4413 – All Actions”. United States Congress. Retrieved June 18, 2014.
  2. ^ Pagliocca, Theresa (April 14, 2014). “Customer Protection and End-User Relief Act (H.R. 4413) Receives House Committee Approval”. DTCC. Retrieved June 18, 2014.
  3. ^ “CBO – H.R. 4413”. Congressional Budget Office. May 19, 2014. Retrieved June 18, 2014.
  4. ^ “Members”. Congressional Western Caucus. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  5. ^ “Oklahoma – Summary Vote Results June 25, 2014 – 05:28PM ET” Associated Press
  6. ^ a b “Election Statistics, 1920 to Present”. US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives. Archived from the original on November 21, 2020. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  7. ^ “About Frank”.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Glenn English
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Oklahoma’s 6th congressional district

1994–2003
Constituency abolished
Preceded by
Wes Watkins
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Oklahoma’s 3rd congressional district

2003–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Collin Peterson
Chair of the House Agriculture Committee
2011–2015
Succeeded by
Mike Conaway
Preceded by
Eddie Bernice Johnson
Ranking Member of the House Science Committee
2019–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Bennie Thompson
United States representatives by seniority
27th
Succeeded by
Lloyd Doggett


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Agriculture
  • Committee on Financial Services
    • Subcommittee on Capital Markets and Government Sponsored Enterprises
    • Subcommittee on Domestic Monetary Policy and Technology
  • Committee on Science, Space and Technology
    • Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics
    • Subcommittee on Energy and Environment

Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Congressman Lucas.

Issues

X
Tom ColeTom Cole

Current Position: US Representative for OK 4th District since 2003
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Secretary of State of Oklahoma from 1996 – 1999

Featured Quote: 
I’m struck by Cuban protestors celebrating U.S. freedoms while many Americans turn their backs on our own flag. As the brightest beacon for freedom & opportunity worldwide, the U.S. must stand with them in their fight for democracy. #SOSCuba

Featured Video: 
‘They are only dividing us further:’ Oklahoma Congressman Tom Cole speaks against impeachment

Senator Jim Inhofe and Representative Tom Cole speak at banquet
KSWO, Alex Rosa-FigueroaSeptember 2, 2021 (Short)

LAWTON, Okla. (KSWO) – One of Oklahoma’s congressional representatives spoke at the 10th Annual FIRES Chapter AUSA Banquet on Sept. 2.

The event recognizes and honors the men and women who support Fort Sill and the post’s efforts.

In addition, the event honored U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe and Representative Tom Cole, for their years of dedication to the Oklahoma service members and the military.

Cole was a guest speaker for tonight’s banquet, and praised the cooperative nature of the Lawton-Fort Sill community, even in the most trying of times.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for OK 4th District since 2003
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Secretary of State of Oklahoma from 1996 – 1999

Featured Quote: 
I’m struck by Cuban protestors celebrating U.S. freedoms while many Americans turn their backs on our own flag. As the brightest beacon for freedom & opportunity worldwide, the U.S. must stand with them in their fight for democracy. #SOSCuba

Featured Video: 
‘They are only dividing us further:’ Oklahoma Congressman Tom Cole speaks against impeachment

News

Senator Jim Inhofe and Representative Tom Cole speak at banquet
KSWO, Alex Rosa-FigueroaSeptember 2, 2021 (Short)

LAWTON, Okla. (KSWO) – One of Oklahoma’s congressional representatives spoke at the 10th Annual FIRES Chapter AUSA Banquet on Sept. 2.

The event recognizes and honors the men and women who support Fort Sill and the post’s efforts.

In addition, the event honored U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe and Representative Tom Cole, for their years of dedication to the Oklahoma service members and the military.

Cole was a guest speaker for tonight’s banquet, and praised the cooperative nature of the Lawton-Fort Sill community, even in the most trying of times.

Twitter

About

Tom Cole 1

Source: Government page

dentified by Time Magazine as “one of the sharpest minds in the House,” Tom Cole is currently serving in his tenth term in the U.S. House of Representatives. At the outset of his service in Congress, Cole was named one of the “Five Freshmen to Watch” by Roll Call. In 2016, he was recognized by Newsmax as the “hardest working member in Congress.” He was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in 2017.

Cole is recognized as a tireless advocate for taxpayers and small businesses, supporter of a strong national defense and leader in promoting biomedical research. He is considered the foremost expert in the House on issues related to Native Americans and tribal governments.

Since 2009, Cole has served on the powerful House Appropriations Committee, where he is currently Vice Ranking Member of the full committee and Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies (LHHS). While serving as LHHS Chairman during the 115th Congress, Cole shepherded completion of the subcommittee’s annual funding bill and participated in the bicameral conference committee that negotiated the final product for fiscal year 2019. When it was signed into law in September 2018, it marked the first time in 22 years that the bill was completed in full and on time.

Cole was appointed to the House Rules Committee in 2013 and has remained on the panel since then. He currently serves as Ranking Member, the top Republican leadership position on the committee. Cole also serves as a Deputy Whip for the Republican Conference and sits on the House Republican Steering Committee.

Cole has a significant background of service to his home state of Oklahoma. He has served as the State Chairman of the Oklahoma Republican Party, District Director to former Congressman Mickey Edwards, a member of the Oklahoma State Senate and as Oklahoma’s Secretary of State. In this capacity, he served as former Governor Frank Keating’s chief legislative strategist and liaison to the state’s federal delegation. Keating tapped Cole to lead Oklahoma’s successful effort to secure federal funds to assist in the rebuilding of Oklahoma City in the wake of the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on April 19,1995.

Cole is widely regarded as one of the GOP’s top political strategists. He served as Executive Director of the National Republican Congressional Committee in the 1992 cycle. He also served as Chief of Staff of the Republican National Committee during the historic 2000 cycle in which Republicans won the presidency, the Senate and the House for the first time in 48 years. In the 2008 cycle, Cole served as Chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee.

Cole is a founding partner and past president of CHS & Associates, a nationally recognized political consulting and survey research firm based in Oklahoma City. The firm has been named one of the top 20 in its field and has dozens of past and current clients scattered across the country.

A former college instructor in history and politics, Cole holds a B.A. from Grinnell College, an M.A. from Yale University and a Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Cole has been a Thomas Watson Fellow and a Fulbright Fellow at the University of London. Cole has also received honorary degrees from Randall University (formerly Hillsdale Bible College) in Moore, Oklahoma City University and Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. He previously served for six years on the Smithsonian Institution Board of Regents.

Cole is a fifth generation Oklahoman and an enrolled member of the Chickasaw Nation. He is one of only five Native Americans currently serving in Congress. Since 2009, he has served as the Republican Co-Chair of the Congressional Native American Caucus. The National Congress of American Indians has recognized Cole’s distinguished service with the Congressional Leadership award on three different occasions (2007, 2011 and 2017), more than any other Member of Congress in the history of the organization. He was inducted into the Chickasaw Hall of Fame in 2004.

Cole’s late mother, Helen, was also a member of the Chickasaw Hall of Fame and served as a state representative, state senator and the Mayor of Moore in her native state of Oklahoma. Cole’s late father, John, served 20 years in the United States Air Force and worked an additional two decades as a civilian federal employee at Tinker Air Force Base.

Tom and his wife, Ellen, have one son, Mason, and reside in Moore, Oklahoma.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Addiction, Treatment and Recovery Caucus
Aerospace Caucus
Air Force Caucus
Air Mobility Caucus
Apprenticeship Caucus
Army Caucus
Baltic Caucus
Bourbon Caucus
Career & Technical Education Caucus
Caucus of the Humane Bond
Congressional ALS Caucus
Congressional Battlefield Caucus
Congressional Caucus on U.S.-Turkish Relations and Turkish Americans
Congressional Coalition on Adoption
Congressional Friends of Denmark Caucus
Congressional Friends of Swedish Caucus
Congressional History Caucus
Congressional Multible Sclerosis Caucus
Congressional Social Determinants of Health Caucus
Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus
Congressional TRIO Caucus
Conservative Opportunity Society
Depot Caucus
Friends of Australia Caucus
General Aviation Caucus
House Energy Action Team
Invisible Wounds Caucus (Traumatic Brain Injury Task Force)
Joint Strike Fighter Caucus
Long Range Bomber Caucus
National Gallery of Art Caucus
National Guard and Reserve Caucus
National Service Caucus
Native American Caucus, Co-Chair
Natural Gas Caucus
Postal Preservation Caucus
Pre-K Caucus, Co-Chair
Pro-life Caucus
Rare Earth Caucus
Republican Study Committee
UAV Caucus
USO Caucus
Youth Challenge Caucus

Offices

Washington, DC Office

2207 Rayburn HOB
WashingtonDC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-6165

District Offices

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Thomas Jeffery Cole (born April 28, 1949) is the U.S. Representative for Oklahoma’s 4th congressional district, serving since 2003. He is a member of the Republican Party and serves as Deputy Minority Whip. The chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) from 2006 to 2008, he was, during his tenure, the fourth-ranking Republican leader in the House. A member of the Chickasaw Nation, Cole is one of only four registered Native Americans in Congress, along with Markwayne Mullin of Oklahoma, Yvette Herrell[1] of New Mexico and Sharice Davids of Kansas.

Early life, education, and educating career

Cole was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, the son of Helen Te Ata (née Gale) and John D. Cole.[2] He is a fifth-generation Oklahoman, having been raised in Moore, halfway between Oklahoma City and Norman. He graduated from Grinnell College in 1971 with a B.A. in history. His postgraduate degrees include an M.A. from Yale University (1974) and a Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma (1984), both in British history. Cole’s Ph.D. thesis was Life and Labor in the Isle of Dogs: The Origins and Evolution of an East London Working-Class Community, 1800–1980. He did research abroad as a Thomas J. Watson Fellow and was a Fulbright Fellow (1977–78) at the University of London. He was a college professor in history and politics before becoming a politician.[citation needed]

Cole was awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree from Grinnell College in 2016;[3] on January 10, 2021, the college received a petition asking for the revocation of the degree in response to his objection to the certification of the Electoral College votes for president in the 2020 election. Subsequently, Cole voluntarily relinquished the degree.[4]

Early political career

Following his mother Helen, who served as a state representative and senator, Cole served in the Oklahoma Senate from 1988 to 1991, resigning mid-term to become Executive Director of the National Republican Congressional Committee. From 1995 to 1999, he was Oklahoma’s Secretary of State under Governor Frank Keating, and assisted with the recovery efforts following the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. He resigned to become chief of staff to the Republican National Committee.[5][6] He also served as chairman of the Oklahoma Republican Party for much of the 1980s.

Cole has been heavily involved in national politics as well, having served both as Executive Director of the NRCC and as Chief of Staff of the Republican National Committee (RNC).

Cole spent two years working as a paid consultant for the United States Chamber of Commerce, but his primary involvement in politics was as a political consultant for candidates. Along with partners Sharon Hargrave Caldwell and Deby Snodgrass, his firm (Cole, Hargrave, Snodgrass and Associates) played a large part in the reconstruction of Oklahoma’s political landscape, and backed a number of candidates who took office during the Republican Revolution of 1994. Among their clients have been Keating, J.C. Watts, Tom Coburn, Frank Lucas, Mary Fallin, Wes Watkins, Steve Largent, Chip Pickering, and Linda Lingle.

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

During his initial campaign for the House of Representatives in 2002, Cole received the endorsement of Watts, the popular outgoing congressman. This helped him win a hard-fought general election over Democratic nominee and former Oklahoma State Senator Darryl Roberts, with 53.8% of the vote to Roberts’s 46.1%. Cole has won at least 63% of the vote in each of his eight reelection campaigns, and ran unopposed in 2010.

Tenure

Following the 2006 election cycle, the members of the House Republican Conference elected Cole to the post of NRCC Chairman, placing him in charge of national efforts to assist Republican candidates for Congress.

His voting record during his nine years in the House marks Cole as a solid conservative with occasional libertarian sympathies. He has consistently voted anti-abortion and pro-business positions, and established himself as a supporter of free trade, gun rights, the military, veterans, and American Indian issues. He favors loosening immigration restrictions and imposing stricter limits on campaign funds. In 2012, he sponsored H.R. 5912 which would prohibit public funds from being used for political party conventions. This legislation passed the House in September but awaits action by the Senate.[7]

In June 2013, after another failure of the United States farm bill in Congress, Cole called the failure of the legislation inexcusable. His district in Oklahoma includes some of the state’s farming communities, and if the Farm Bill passed, it would have saved $40 billion over a ten-year period.[8]

As Chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch, Cole was responsible for introducing the Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4487; 113th Congress).[9] The bill would appropriate $3.3 billion to the legislative branch for FY 2015, which is approximately the same amount it received in FY 2014.[10] According to Cole, the bill meets its goals “in both an effective and efficient manner, and has done so in a genuinely bipartisan, inclusive and deliberative fashion.”[11]

In 2013, Cole introduced the Home School Equity Act for Tax Relief. The bill would allow some homeschool parents to take tax credits for purchasing classroom materials.[12]

Cole expressed his intention in 2018 to push his Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act into the spending bill as an omnibus. The bill would “make clear that the National Labor Relations Board has no jurisdiction over businesses owned and operated by an Indian tribe and located on tribal land.”[13]

Cole was ranked as the 91st most bipartisan member of the U.S. House of Representatives during the 114th United States Congress by The Lugar Center.[14]

2016 House Speakership election

In the contest for House Speaker that followed the resignation of John Boehner Cole supported the claims of Paul Ryan:

“Anyone who attacks Paul Ryan as being insufficiently conservative is either woefully misinformed or maliciously destructive…Paul Ryan has played a major role in advancing the conservative cause and creating the Republican House majority. His critics are not true conservatives. They are radical populists who neither understand nor accept the institutions, procedures and traditions that are the basis of constitutional governance.”[15]

Political positions

Cole supported President Donald Trump‘s 2017 executive order to impose a temporary ban on entry to the U.S. to citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries.[16]

In January 2021, Cole voted against the certification of the Electoral College results in the 2020 presidential election.[17] He subsequently voluntarily gave up an honorary degree from Grinnell College.[18] In May 2021, Cole voted against the creation of a bipartisan commission to investigate the January 6 insurrection.[19]

Iraq

In June 2021, Cole was one of 49 House Republicans to vote to repeal the AUMF against Iraq.[20][21]

Committee memberships

Caucus Membership

Electoral history

Oklahoma’s 4th congressional district: Results 2002–2020[23]
YearRepublicanVotesPctDemocratVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct
2002Tom Cole106,45253.83%Darryl Roberts91,32246.17%
2004Tom Cole198,98577.77%(no candidate)Charlene K. BradshawIndependent56,86922.23%
2006Tom Cole118,26664.61%Hal Spake64,77535.39%
2008Tom Cole180,08066.02%Blake Cummings79,67429.21%David E. JoyceIndependent13,0274.78%
2010*Tom Cole32,58977.26%(no candidate)Republican9,59322.74%
2012Tom Cole176,56167.89%Donna Marie Bebo71,15527.60%Independent11,7254.51%
2014Tom Cole117,72170.80%Bert Smith40,99824.66%Dennis B. JohnsonIndependent7,5494.54%
2016Tom Cole203,94269.64%Christina Owen76,30826.08%Sevier WhiteLibertarian12,5484.28%
2018Tom Cole149,12763.07%Mary Brannon78,02233.00%Ruby PetersIndependent9,3103.94%
2020Tom Cole213,09667.80%Mary Brannon90,45928.80%Bob WhiteLibertarian10,8033.40%
  • In 2010, no Democrat or independent candidate filed to run in OK-4. The results printed here are from the Republican primary, where the election was decided.

Personal life

Cole and his wife, Ellen, have one son, Mason. He is a member of the United Methodist Church and lives in Moore.

Cole has said, “I was raised to think of myself as Native American and, most importantly, as Chickasaw.”[24] Cole has said that a great-aunt of his was the Native American storyteller Te Ata.[24] Describing his heritage, he said his “mother Helen Cole[25] was…extraordinarily proud of [their] Native American history and was, frankly, the first Native American woman ever elected to state senate in Oklahoma.”[24]

Cole sits on the Smithsonian Institution Board of Regents and the National Fulbright Association.[26] Cole is featured in the play Sliver of a Full Moon by Mary Kathryn Nagle for his role in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act in 2013.[27]

See also

References

  1. ^ New Mexico becomes first state to elect all women of color to the House of Representatives
  2. ^ “cole”. Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-13. Retrieved 2015-10-27.
  3. ^ “GOP Rep. Tom Cole relinquishes honorary degree after students petition college to remove it”. 13 January 2021.
  4. ^ “Rep. Tom Cole Voluntarily Relinquishes Honorary Degree | Grinnell College”.
  5. ^ Official Lands GOP Post Keating to Name New Secretary of State
  6. ^ RNC picks new chief of staff
  7. ^ “H.R. 5912: To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to prohibit the use of public funds for political party conventions”. Retrieved 12 October 2012.
  8. ^ Casteel, Chris (June 21, 2013). “Oklahoma Reps. Tom Cole, Jim Bridenstine Disagree on Farm Bill”. NewsOK. Retrieved 20 July 2013.
  9. ^ “H.R. 4487 – All Actions”. United States Congress. Retrieved 2 May 2014.
  10. ^ Marcos, Cristina (25 April 2014). “Next week:Appropriations season begins”. The Hill. Retrieved 1 May 2014.
  11. ^ Hess, Hannah (2 April 2014). “Legislative Branch Bill Keeps House Spending in Check”. Roll Call. Retrieved 14 May 2014.
  12. ^ Jim East, “Legislation would give home school families access to education tax deduction” Archived 2013-08-28 at archive.today, The Ripon Advance, August 28, 2013. (Retrieved August 28, 2013)
  13. ^ Wong, Scott. “Five things lawmakers want attached to the $1 trillion funding bill”. The Hill. Retrieved 10 March 2018.
  14. ^ The Lugar Center – McCourt School Bipartisan Index (PDF), The Lugar Center, March 7, 2016, retrieved April 30, 2017
  15. ^ Steinhauer, Jennifer (12 October 2015). “Latest Unease on Right – Is Ryan Too Far to the Left?”. New York Times. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  16. ^ Blake, Aaron (29 January 2017). “Coffman, Gardner join Republicans against President Trump’s travel ban; here’s where the rest stand”. Denver Post. Retrieved 30 January 2017.
  17. ^ I’m just furious’: Relations in Congress crack after attack”. POLITICO. Retrieved 2021-01-29.
  18. ^ Choi, Joseph (13 January 2021). “GOP lawmaker gives up honorary college degree in wake of Electoral College vote”. TheHill. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  19. ^ Gorman, Reese (19 May 2021). “Cole votes against bipartisan Jan. 6 Commission”. The Norman Transcript. Retrieved July 28, 2021.
  20. ^ “House votes to repeal 2002 Iraq War authorization”.
  21. ^ https://clerk.house.gov/evs/2021/roll172.xml
  22. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  23. ^ “Election Statistics”. Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. Retrieved 2008-01-10.
  24. ^ a b c Native American Heritage Month Keynote Address (Speech). Library of Congress. 2007-11-06. Retrieved 2008-09-01.
  25. ^ Helen Cole Archived 2010-05-31 at the Wayback Machine
  26. ^ “Tom Cole Full Biography”. Tom Cole U.S. Congressman. 11 December 2012. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  27. ^ “sliver of a full moon”. sliver of a full moon. Retrieved 2016-12-12.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Secretary of State of Oklahoma
1995–1999
Succeeded by
Mike Hunter
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
J. C. Watts
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Oklahoma’s 4th congressional district

2003–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Jim McGovern
Ranking Member of the House Rules Committee
2019–present
Party political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Reynolds
Chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee
2007–2009
Succeeded by
Pete Sessions
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
John Carter
United States representatives by seniority
61st
Succeeded by
Mario Díaz-Balart


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Appropriations (Vice Ranking Member)
    • Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Ranking Member)
    • Subcommittee on Defense
    • Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies
  • Committee on the Budget
  • Committee on Rules (Ranking Member)

Legislation

sponsoring and co-sponsoring

Issues

Agriculture

There are no better stewards of the land than those whose livelihood depends on that land. In Congress, I work closely with my colleagues to ensure that our farmers and ranchers are not needlessly regulated and that safety nets, such as crop insurance, remain in place to protect against the volatile effects of drought, floods, tornadoes and other natural disasters.

Defense and National Security

Congress has no greater responsibility than to provide our military with the training and resources needed to confront the mounting security challenges and threats around the world. As a senior member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense, I am a champion for a strong national defense and returning fiscal discipline to the Pentagon. I will continue to support a strong military well-equipped to face the challenges of the 21st century.

Economy

I have consistently supported legislation and policies to get the nation’s long-term fiscal house in order by balancing the budget and reforming entitlements, so we can eventually pay down our debt.

Education

As a former educator, I understand how important it is for our children to have access to a quality education. I am committed to ensuring parents and teachers have the tools and resources necessary to provide the best possible educational opportunities for our children.

Energy

I support an all-of-the-above energy strategy that encourages domestic production, reduces our dependency on foreign oil and explores alternative energy solutions.

Financial Services

Financial institutions such as community banks and credit unions play a critical role in our local economy. Local lending institutions can more effectively help customers because of their detailed knowledge of customers and close ties to the community. This presence helps businesses buy new equipment, add to the workforce and improve products and services to the local economy.

Foreign Affairs

While much of the power to conduct foreign affairs is granted to the president by the U.S. Constitution, Congress can and should still shape foreign policy and play a vital role in ensuring the world remains a safe place and that our citizens are protected from harm.

Healthcare

Nearly a decade since a Democrat-controlled Congress and President Obama passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, it is evident that Obamacare failed to live up to its many promises, particularly those related to affordability of and access to care.

Immigration

Just as we are a nation of immigrants, America is also a nation of laws, and those laws must be obeyed and enforced. I believe that securing our borders and stopping the flood of illegal immigrants must be a top priority for our nation.

Life

As penned in the Declaration of Independence, our forefathers founded America with the strong belief that individuals are “endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights.” Among those is the right to life, which influences my commitment to protecting the most vulnerable, including the unborn.

Natural Resources

We must maintain programs to manage our resources wisely, while working with landowners to ensure that their property rights are protected.

Science and Technology

The health and longevity of Oklahoma’s economy depends in large part on the acceleration of scientific and technological innovations. Maintaining Oklahoma’s leadership in these fields requires a concerted effort to ensure ongoing investments in technology, education and science.

Second Amendment

As one of the founding principles of our nation, the right to bear arms must be fully upheld, and I am committed to protecting the rights of responsible gun owners who safely use guns for hunting and protection. And in Oklahoma, we know that guns are tools to be used responsibly.

Small Business

When I travel across the Fourth District of Oklahoma, I am always inspired by the entrepreneurial spirit and can-do attitude of our own small businesses. Whether as an employee or owner, Americans depend greatly on small business success.

Social Security

I am committed to addressing the challenges facing Social Security, sustaining and protecting the program for current beneficiaries and future retirees. No program does more to ensure that every American can have a decent retirement.

Taxes

America is a global leader in business and innovation, yet for many years, our tax code was outdated. Prior to 2017, the last major update of our tax code was in 1986. The tax system – a compilation of $1.6 trillion in annual deductions, credits, exclusions, exemptions and special rates – was enormously complex and created confusion, distortions in economic incentives and hindered America’s economic competitiveness to the detriment of Americans’ opportunities.

Transportation

A safe, efficient and well-maintained infrastructure is not only critical to moving people and products, but it strengthens our nation’s economy. To keep our economy moving, I believe we must invest in and modernize the nation’s roads, bridges, airports and waterways.

Tribal Relations

As an enrolled member of the Chickasaw Nation, I am very proud of my heritage and the tremendous accomplishments of tribes in Oklahoma and across our country. The U.S. Constitution and the federal government recognize that Native American tribes are sovereign entities with separate governments and rights that should be honored and respected.

Veterans & Military Retirees

Our veterans, who have served during war and peace, have made tremendous sacrifices to protect our freedoms. They are defenders of democracy and have ensured all Americans can continue to enjoy freedom and peace.

X
Stephanie BiceStephanie Bice

Current Position: US Representative for OK 5th District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2014 – 2020

Featured Quote: 
July is almost over! This is your LAST CHANCE to share which issues should be my top priorities next month. Your answer directly impacts my direction in Congress. Please click below to complete my survey! Thank you!

Featured Video: 
Conversations with Candidates: State Sen. Stephanie Bice

Oklahoma’s Congresswoman Stephanie Bice issued a statement on Friday, calling President Joe Biden’s sweeping COVID-19 vaccine mandates “unconstitutional.”

On Thursday, Biden announced expansive rules mandating that all employers with more than 100 workers require them to be vaccinated or test for the virus weekly, affecting about 80 million Americans. And the roughly 17 million workers at health facilities that receive federal Medicare or Medicaid also will have to be fully vaccinated, according to the Associated Press.

Rep. Stephanie Bice of Oklahoma released a statement, saying that people should be able to make the decision for themselves:

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for OK 5th District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2014 – 2020

Featured Quote: 
July is almost over! This is your LAST CHANCE to share which issues should be my top priorities next month. Your answer directly impacts my direction in Congress. Please click below to complete my survey! Thank you!

Featured Video: 
Conversations with Candidates: State Sen. Stephanie Bice

News

Oklahoma’s Congresswoman Stephanie Bice issued a statement on Friday, calling President Joe Biden’s sweeping COVID-19 vaccine mandates “unconstitutional.”

On Thursday, Biden announced expansive rules mandating that all employers with more than 100 workers require them to be vaccinated or test for the virus weekly, affecting about 80 million Americans. And the roughly 17 million workers at health facilities that receive federal Medicare or Medicaid also will have to be fully vaccinated, according to the Associated Press.

Rep. Stephanie Bice of Oklahoma released a statement, saying that people should be able to make the decision for themselves:

Twitter

About

Stephanie Bice 1

Source: Government page

Congresswoman Stephanie Bice is a fourth generation Oklahoman, born and raised in Oklahoma’s Fifth Congressional District. She graduated from Oklahoma State University in 1995 with a degree in Marketing and International Business.

Prior to her election to Congress, Bice served in the Oklahoma State Senate for six years. During her tenure, she was Assistant Majority Floor Leader and Chair of the Senate Finance Committee.

Before her public service, Bice worked in the private sector for eight years in financial oversight, business strategy and marketing for her family’s technology company. In addition, she ran her own marketing company, and later helped lead a boutique digital marketing agency as vice president of business development.

Oklahoma’s Fifth Congressional District includes all or parts of Oklahoma, Pottawatomie and Seminole counties.

In the House of Representatives, Bice was elected by her peers to serve as Freshman Class President and serves as a member of the Republican Whip Team.

Stephanie and her husband Geoffrey have two daughters and are members of St. Eugene Catholic Church.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Offices

1223 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone: (202) 225-2132
500 N. Broadway
Suite 250

Oklahoma City, OK  73102

Phone: (405) 300-6890
Fax: (855) 235-5024

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

search

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Stephanie Irene Bice (née Asady, Persian: اسدی‎; November 11, 1973)[2] is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Oklahoma’s 5th congressional district since 2021. A member of the Republican Party, she is the first Iranian American to be elected to Congress. Bice represented the 22nd district in the Oklahoma Senate from 2014 to 2020.

Early life, education, and early career

Bice was born in Oklahoma City to an American mother (Paula Sue Vanhooser, of Dutch heritage) and an Iranian-born father (Hosein “Joe” Asady). Asady came to the United States at a young age to study computer science. He received a BS degree from the University of Central Oklahoma in 1973 and became an American citizen in 1975. Asady is the founder and CEO of a network technology company.

After graduating from Oklahoma State University with a bachelor’s degree in marketing and a minor in international business,[3] Bice worked for eight years in financial oversight, business strategy and marketing for her family’s technology company in Oklahoma City. She later helped lead a boutique digital marketing agency in Oklahoma City as vice president of business development.[4][5]

Oklahoma Senate

Elections

Bice was first elected to the Oklahoma Senate in 2014.[6] She was reelected in 2018 with 73% of the vote in the Republican primary and 68% of the vote in the general election.[7][8][9]

Tenure

Bice represented the 22nd district in the Oklahoma Senate from 2014 to 2020.[10][11][12] She served on the Subcommittee on General Government and Transportation, and the Business, Commerce & Tourism, Finance, Public Safety committees.[12] In 2016, the Senate Republican Caucus elected Bice Assistant Majority Floor Leader.[13]

Bice was the Senate sponsor of House Bill 1269, a law that provided relief to people who were serving felony prison sentences for crimes that are now misdemeanors.[14] Instead of automatically granting retroactive relief to all eligible inmates, state lawmakers directed the Pardon and Parole Board to establish an accelerated, single-stage commutation docket to review eligible cases.

Bice sponsored SB 142, which required informed consent for nursing home patients and their families regarding the use of powerful antipsychotic drugs.[15][better source needed] The measure deals with the overuse of powerful antipsychotic drugs for nursing home patients who have not received a psychiatric diagnosis or given informed consent. The measure was signed into law in May 2019.

Bice was a sponsor of State Question 792, which overhauled Oklahoma’s liquor laws by allowing grocery stores to sell full point beer and wine.[16]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2020

In April 2019, Bice announced her candidacy for Oklahoma’s 5th congressional district in the 2020 election.[17] The 5th district had been a Republican stronghold for over 40 years until Democrat Kendra Horn was elected in 2018.[18]

In June 2020, Oklahoman.com reported that the Bice campaign sent a mailer including the Oklahomans for Life logo without the organization’s permission. Bice said, “I understand Oklahomans for Life wasn’t endorsing in this race and wanted to make clear that I am pro-life and have stood with Oklahomans for Life”.[19]

Bice placed second in the June 30 Republican primary behind Terry Neese, a businesswoman who was the Republican nominee for lieutenant governor of Oklahoma in 1990. As no candidate won 50% of the vote, Bice and Neese advanced to a runoff.[20][21] Bice defeated Neese in the runoff and Horn in the general election.[22][23] She focused her campaign on immigration and affordable healthcare.[10]

Bice is the first Iranian American to be elected to Congress.[24]

Tenure

In late 2020, Bice was identified as a participant in the Freedom Force, a group of incoming Republican members of the House of Representatives who “say they’re fighting against socialism in America”.[25][26][27]

On January 6, 2021, Bice voted not to accept the certified results of the 2020 U.S. presidential election in Arizona and Pennsylvania.[28]

In March 2021, Bice voted against the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.[29]

On May 19, 2021, Bice was one of 35 Republicans who joined all Democrats in voting to approve legislation to establish the January 6, 2021 commission meant to investigate the storming of the U.S. Capitol.[30]

Personal life

Bice graduated from Putnam City High School in Oklahoma.[31] She married Geoffrey Bice in 1996.[32] They have two daughters and live in Edmond, Oklahoma.[31] Bice is Catholic and attends St. Eugene Catholic Church in Oklahoma City.[33]

Electoral history

2020 congressional election

2020 general election results, Oklahoma’s 5th congressional district[34]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Stephanie Bice 158,191 52.1
DemocraticKendra Horn145,65847.9
Total votes303,849 100.0
2020 Republican primary runoff results, Oklahoma’s 5th congressional district[35]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Stephanie Bice 27,402 52.9
RepublicanTerry Neese24,36947.1
Total votes51,771 100.0
2020 Republican primary results, Oklahoma’s 5th congressional district[36]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Terry Neese 24,822 36.5
Republican Stephanie Bice 17,289 25.4
RepublicanDavid Hill12,91519.0
RepublicanJanet Barresi6,79610.0
RepublicanJake A. Merrick1,7362.6
RepublicanMichael Ballard1,6892.5
RepublicanMiles V. Rahimi9661.4
RepublicanShelli Landon9121.3
RepublicanCharles Tuffy Pringle9071.3
Total votes68,032 100.0

2018 Oklahoma Senate election

2018 general election results, Oklahoma Senate District 22[8]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Stephanie Bice 24,465 68.3% N/A
DemocraticWilliam Andrews11,37731.7%N/A
Total votes35,842 100% N/A

2014 Oklahoma Senate election

Bice was unopposed in the 2014 general election.[37]

2014 Republican runoff primary results, Oklahoma Senate District 22[38]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Stephanie Bice 2,693 53.1
RepublicanMark Thomas2,38146.9
Total votes5,074 100.0
2014 Republican primary results, Oklahoma Senate District 22[39]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Stephanie Bice 3,191 37.1
Republican Mark Thomas 2,845 33.2
RepublicanLeif Francel2,53729.6
Total votes8,573 100.0

See also

References

  1. ^ “Rep. Stephanie Bice”. LegiStorm. Retrieved January 18, 2021. Full Name: Stephanie Irene Bice … Alternate Name: Stephanie Irene Asady
  2. ^ “Stephanie Bice”. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  3. ^ Snyder, Dan (June 17, 2020). “Meet the candidate: Stephanie Bice (R-OK5)”. KOKH.
  4. ^ Forman, Carmen (April 12, 2020). “Outlook 2020: Bice played a key role in bringing Oklahoma into the modern liquor era”. Oklahoman.com. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  5. ^ “Bice announces bid”. Yukon Progress. April 26, 2019. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  6. ^ “State Sen. Bice to challenge Oklahoma US Rep. Horn in 2020”. KJRH. April 24, 2019.
  7. ^ “Stephanie Bice”. Ballotpedia. Retrieved December 12, 2019.
  8. ^ a b “State Election Results, General Election, November 6, 2018”. www.ok.gov.
  9. ^ OFFICIAL RESULTS – Primary Election, Oklahoma Secretary of State, June 26, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2021.
  10. ^ a b Stabile, Angelica (November 9, 2020). “13 GOP women join the House, dominating congressional elections, making history”. FOX News. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  11. ^ “Oklahoma District 5 election results: Stephanie Bice beats Kendra Horn for House seat”. Oklahoman.com. November 4, 2020.
  12. ^ a b “Senator Stephanie Bice – District 22”. Oksenate.gov. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  13. ^ “Bice gets GOP leadership role”. edmondlifeandleisure.com. Retrieved December 12, 2019.
  14. ^ “How Oklahoma enacted the largest commutation in US history”. Washington Examiner. November 15, 2019. Retrieved December 12, 2019.
  15. ^ “Oklahoma State Senate – News”. Oklahoma Senate. Retrieved December 12, 2019.
  16. ^ “Oklahoma State Question 792 alcohol ballot measure approved”. Oklahoman. November 8, 2016. Retrieved December 12, 2019.
  17. ^ Scavelli, Melissa (April 24, 2019). “Stephanie Bice to run against Horn in 2020”. KOKH. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  18. ^ “Kendra Horn upsets Steve Russell in an Oklahoma City stunner”. Oklahoman.com. November 6, 2018. Retrieved September 19, 2020.
  19. ^ “Anti-abortion group claims mail pieces misleading in 5th District primary”. Oklahoman.com. June 18, 2020. Retrieved September 19, 2020.
  20. ^ “Live Primary Election Results: Races in Colorado, Oklahoma and Utah”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  21. ^ Adger, Patrina (July 1, 2020). “Terry Neese, Stephanie Bice advance to Republican House runoff election”. KOCO. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  22. ^ Axelrod, Tal (August 25, 2020). “Bice wins Oklahoma GOP runoff to face Horn in November”. TheHill. Retrieved August 26, 2020.
  23. ^ “Bice defeats Horn, wins back Oklahoma’s lone Democratic seat”. AP NEWS. November 3, 2020.
  24. ^ Firozi, Paulina. “House GOP chipped away at Democratic majority. They can thank female candidates” – via www.washingtonpost.com.
  25. ^ Jankowicz, Mia. “A group of incoming GOP House members, calling themselves the ‘Freedom Force,’ are trying to counter Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s ‘Squad. Business Insider.
  26. ^ Parke, Caleb (December 1, 2020). “GOP Congresswoman-elect on forming ‘Freedom Force’: Left is ‘totally out of line’ with mainstream”. Fox News.
  27. ^ “The ‘Freedom Force’: Republican group takes on the Squad and ‘evil’ socialism”. the Guardian. November 30, 2020.
  28. ^ Polansky, Chris (January 7, 2021). “After Attack, All 5 Oklahoma US Representatives Still Vote To Oppose Certified Election Results”. www.publicradiotulsa.org. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  29. ^ “FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 49”. clerk.house.gov. Retrieved April 27, 2021.
  30. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (May 19, 2021). “Here are the 35 House Republicans who voted for the January 6 commission”. CNN. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  31. ^ a b “About | Stephanie Bice for Congress”. BiceforCongress.com. Retrieved September 19, 2020.
  32. ^ “Bice Marriage License”.
  33. ^ “Oklahoma senator is named ‘Friend of Faith’ – Article Photos”. Oklahoman.com. Retrieved September 19, 2020.
  34. ^ “Oklahoma State Election Board Official Results, November 3, 2020”. Results.OKElections.us. Retrieved November 19, 2020.
  35. ^ “Oklahoma State Election Board Official Results, August 25, 2020”. Results.OKElections.us. Retrieved October 15, 2020.
  36. ^ “Oklahoma State Election Board Official Results, June 30, 2020”. Results.OKElections.us. Retrieved June 30, 2020.
  37. ^ Holp, Karen. “Now Official: In Many Uncontested Races, Candidates Have Been Winners For Awhile”. www.kgou.org.
  38. ^ “Oklahoma State Election Board – 20140826 Runoffprimaryelections”. www.ok.gov.
  39. ^ “Oklahoma State Election Board – 20140624 Primaryelections”. www.ok.gov.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Kendra Horn
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Oklahoma’s 5th congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Cliff Bentz
United States representatives by seniority
374th
Succeeded by
Lauren Boebert